People To Be Loved by Preston Sprinkle: A Review

Okay, I know it's Thursday. It's almost the end of the week and you're probably in the mood to watch kittens or something on Youtube rather than read a serious book review, but that's what I've got for you today. And it's a book I think needs to be talked about. It's a book that needs to be read. By everyone.

Let me tell you about it.




People To Be Loved: A Summary


Christians who are confused by the homosexuality debate raging in the US are looking for resources that are based solidly on a deep study of what Scripture says about the issue. In People to Be Loved, Preston Sprinkle challenges those on all sides of the debate to consider what the Bible says and how we should approach the topic of homosexuality in light of it.
In a manner that appeals to a scholarly and lay-audience alike, Preston takes on difficult questions such as how should the church treat people struggling with same-sex attraction? Is same-sex attraction a product of biological or societal factors or both? How should the church think about larger cultural issues, such as gay marriage, gay pride, and whether intolerance over LGBT amounts to racism? How (or if) Christians should do business with LGBT persons and supportive companies?
Simply saying that the Bible condemns homosexuality is not accurate, nor is it enough to end the debate. Those holding a traditional view still struggle to reconcile the Bible’s prohibition of same-sex attraction with the message of radical, unconditional grace. This book meets that need.


People To Be Loved: What I Think

I don't think I've seen another book that takes such a perfect posture in the debate regarding homosexuality and the Church. From the get-go, Preston announces his intention, that he's in this to offer a thorough exegesis on what Scripture says (and doesn't say) about homosexuality and homosexual relationships. He's not here to give his opinion or sway us; rather, he wants us to be educated and serious about our own pursuit of Truth. It's certainly not an easy task, but I think Preston does it very, very well.

His approach to this incredibly divisive issue is an important distinction from other similar works because Preston isn't offering his own beliefs or personal arguments about the issue, even though he could easily do that as a professor, pastor, and Christian. He reminds us, in fact, that it's not really about an issue; above all, it's about people (hence, the title). Preston approaches both affirming and non-affirming views of consensual, monogamous, homosexual relationships with a firm grip on the Word, as well as an intimate knowledge of the cultural influences each author likely dealt with during the time they were writing. He digs deep into our assumptions and strikes them right in the heart, all while expertly navigating the treacherous waters of stating interpretation as fact or putting his own words in God's mouth.

In short, Preston lets God speak for Himself and shows his readers how we have interpreted His statements. Ultimately, we are left to choose for ourselves. But the Truth is never abandoned and, by the end, it seems pretty clear what that choice should be.

This is a book that everyone - believers and non-believers alike - should have on their reading list.

To learn more about People To Be Loved or the author, please visit Preston's official website here. You can also follow him on Twitter!

Please note, I received a free copy of People To Be Loved in exchange for an honest review.


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